Blueprint Construction Plans

I would like to direct your attention to a PDF from archive.org that preserves a special 1946 supplement to American Builders Magazine.

Blueprint Plans from American Buidler Magazine (1946) archive.org

The full PDF at archive.org weighs in at 99MB (78 pages) and would probably take seven years to download, so I’ve broken off two selections into smaller pieces that should be easier for our network connection to digest:

If you ever have the time, check out archive.org for more architecture and design related documents. Let me know if you find something interesting.

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Architectural Plan Views

A floor plan is the most fundamental architectural diagram, a view from above showing the arrangement of spaces in building in the same way as a map, but showing the arrangement at a particular level of a building. Technically it is a horizontal section cut through a building (conventionally at four feet / one metre and twenty centimetres above floor level), showing walls, windows and door openings and other features at that level. The plan view includes anything that could be seen below that level: the floor, stairs (but only up to the plan level), fittings and sometimes furniture. Objects above the plan level (e.g. beams overhead) can be indicated as dotted lines.

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Isometric Town

This week we’ll start by spending some more time working on our 11×17 isometric practice drawings. After that, we can move on to another 11×17 piece of iso paper to start our Isometric Towns; this will be an ongoing drawing that some of you might choose to continue working on during sketch journal time even after we move on to the next type of graphical projection.

Open the full post for video:

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Graphical Projection

We can start with the typical overview introduction, provided this time by Wikipedia:

Graphical projection is a protocol, used in technical drawing, by which an image of a three-dimensional object is projected onto a planar surface without the aid of numerical calculation. The projection is achieved by the use of imaginary “projectors”. The projected, mental image becomes the technician’s vision of the desired, finished picture. By following the protocol the technician may produce the envisioned picture on a planar surface such as drawing paper. The protocols provide a uniform imaging procedure among people trained in technical graphics (mechanical drawing, computer aided design, etc.).

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