New Ideas in University Architecture

Alexandra Lange writes about new trends in University architecture at the New York Times:

Though studies have shown that proximity and conversation can produce creative ideas, there’s little research on the designs needed to facilitate the process. Still, there are commonalities.

In many of the new buildings, an industrial look prevails, along with an end to privacy. You are more likely to find a garage door and a 3-D printer than book-lined offices and closed-off classrooms, more likely to huddle with peers at a round table than go to a lecture hall with seats for 100. Seating is flexible, ranging from bleachers to sofas, office chairs to privacy booths. Furniture is often on wheels, so that groups can rearrange it.

Authenticity: A Slippery Slope

Disney Springs and Invented Florida by Foxxfur at Passports to Dreams Old and New:

So yes, Rollins College may be old – 1885 – but its beautiful architecture is not authentic old Spanish. Strictly speaking, it’s artificial. Of course, in architecture circles, they have a word for this – Spanish Revival, which sits neatly alongside Gothic Revival, Italiante, Renaisance Revival, Queen Anne, Second Empire, Romanesque, and other styles of American architecture built to resemble something they are not. But it’s just as correct to say that Rollins College was built themed to Spanish Florida, with its conquistadors, fountains of youth, and romantic tilework.

The fact is that maybe the most distinctive single thing about American architecture is that we have always and forever loved building themed to other things. That’s why we were the country that created Coney Island and Disneyland. These places weren’t some kind of perversion of a pure cultural legacy, but simply the logical outgrowth of what we’ve always done.