The Typeface of the London Underground

Introducing Johnston100 for TfL from Monotype on Vimeo.

Monotype introduces Johnston100: A contemporary update to Transport for London’s Johnston typeface, marking the centennial of its use across the London bus, rail and Underground systems.

Remastered by Monotype to bring back the original flavour of the Johnston design developed 100 years ago, Johnston100 expands the palette of the original typeface to embrace both contemporary typographic trends and new digital requirements. Johnston100 includes five weights of the design, including two brand new contemporary weights: hairline and thin, and will start appearing across the TfL network later this year. Johnston was originally designed by Edward Johnston in 1916 and is instantly recognisable as the graphic language of London.

Read the full story here: bit.ly/1PpCWSL

Drawings by David Roberts

Picturesque Sketches in Spain Taken During the Years 1832 & 1833

David Roberts (1796–1864, Scotland) was a Scottish landscape painter, known for a prolific series of detailed lithograph prints of Egypt and the Near East that he produced from sketches he made during long tours of the region (1838–1840). These and his large oil paintings of similar subjects made him a prominent Orientalist painter. He was elected as a Royal Academician in 1841. (source: insipit)

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New Ideas in University Architecture

Alexandra Lange writes about new trends in University architecture at the New York Times:

Though studies have shown that proximity and conversation can produce creative ideas, there’s little research on the designs needed to facilitate the process. Still, there are commonalities.

In many of the new buildings, an industrial look prevails, along with an end to privacy. You are more likely to find a garage door and a 3-D printer than book-lined offices and closed-off classrooms, more likely to huddle with peers at a round table than go to a lecture hall with seats for 100. Seating is flexible, ranging from bleachers to sofas, office chairs to privacy booths. Furniture is often on wheels, so that groups can rearrange it.